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Wider adoption of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS)

Published on: 30-Jan-2019

Dr. Brian Cole and Steve Kashul talk with Dr. Steven Feinstein about the use of Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging and the prevention of heart attacks and strokes. Dr. Feinstein developed the first two FDA approved ultrasound contrast agents and is recognized as one of the leading pioneers in the development of non-invasive contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging techniques. Dr. Feinstein is a Professor at the Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical College.

Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) offers a new, safe, radiation-free modality to help problem-solve diagnostic questions in a wide range of clinical applications, according to an article published by researchers from the Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging at University of California San Francisco.Steven B. Feinstein, MD practices Cardiovascular Disease in Chicago

Ultrasound contrast agents have been in use throughout most of the world and have been used off-label in the United State for over a decade. In addition to the use of ultrasound contrast agents in cardiac imaging, the FDA recently approved their use in liver imaging for both paediatric and adult patients, and for use in the urinary tract (voiding ultrasonography) in paediatric patients for evaluation of suspected or known vesicoureteral reflux (VUR).

The recent FDA approvals are likely to spur wider adoption of CEUS, says the article, which details the modality’s key advantages. Since the contrast agents are excreted by the lungs they are safe in patients with renal and/or liver dysfunction whom otherwise may not be able to undergo a contrast-enhanced evaluation. Also, CEUS provides unique advantages and can improve visualisation of blood flow and tissue vascularity.


Carson Lux, PT, SFG-I, 3DMAPS, FMS/SFMAAlso in this segment is a conversation with Carson Lux, a physical therapist and Program Head in the Movement Performance Project at Athletico Physical Therapy. Carson shares his 30 years of experience after graduating from the University of Evansville in 1989. He played HS football, basketball, collegiate baseball, and studied Aikido. Carson subsequently has undergone multiple orthopedic surgeries as a result of his own athletic career and has a unique understanding of what athletes must endure to return to their sports and the current therapy techniques to speed injury rehabilitation.